Paid in Puke S4E10.1 HOLIDAY SPECIAL: Happiest Season

On our (slightly late) Holiday Special, we’re talking about the controversial 2020 film Happiest Season, directed by Clea Duvall and written by Duvall and Mary Holland. It marks our 3rd Mackenzie Davis film. It also stars Kristen Stewart, Holland, Alison Brie, Mary Steenburgen, and Aubrey Plaza. We talk about how Abby should have left Harper for Riley (2/3 of us are Team Riley, and Baxter is a Harper apologist), the very unnecessary and perplexing shoplifting plot, Dan Levy’s pitch-perfect performance, and our complex personal relationships to the holiday season.

Happy Holidays to our beloved Paid in Puke listeners. We will return in Feb-ish with Series 5!

Paid in Puke S4E10: Beatriz at Dinner

On today’s episode, we’re (mostly) delighting in Miguel Arteta’s 2017 dramedy, Beatriz at Dinner, starring Salma Hayek, Connie Britton, Chloë Sevigny, and Amy Landecker. Beatriz (Hayek) is a holistic massage therapist and Mexican immigrant circumstantially trapped in a palatial estate with her wealthy client and her husband’s business partners.

In Hot Probs, we discuss how normally, a Mike White script doesn’t mess around, but this one does a little bit. Still, White does a commendable job depicting racist/classist micro-aggressions through the natural conversational flow of a Boomer dinner party.

On the Lunchtime Poll, we reveal the bridge-too-far in dinner conversation that would prompt us to take a stand and ruin the night for everyone else.

This is the last episode of Series 4, but we’ll be back next week with a late holiday special!

Paid in Puke S4E9: Jackie Brown

On today’s episode, we’re talking about Quentin Tarantino’s first female-driven film, 1997’s Jackie Brown, starring Pam Grier and Bridget Fonda. Based on the novel, Rum Punch by Elmore Leonard, it’s not without the usual Tarantino trappings (feet, rampant use of the n-word, built-in misogyny), but there’s a lot to love in this most underrated of Quentin joints.

On the Lunchtime Poll, we reveal our hypothetical filmmaker signatures and discover something surprising about Mario Cantone.

Paid in Puke S4E8: Okja

On today’s episode, we’re falling in love with Bong Joon Ho’s 2017 adventure drama, Okja, starring An Seo Hyun and Tilda Swinton. It’s an anti-capitalist fairy tale, a touching story of chosen families, an exciting action movie, and a remarkable achievement in CGI.

This is our first title with ZERO Hot Probs, and it’s in stark contrast to our lengthy Meaningful Passages segment. This movie simply rules.

It also inspires us to tell stories of children being traumatized at petting zoos. On the Lunchtime Poll, we reveal our favorite animal tear-jerker films.

Paid in Puke S4E7: Girlfight

On today’s episode, we step into the ring with Karyn Kusama’s 2000 debut drama, Girlfight, starring Michelle Rodriguez in her breakout role. Does Adrienne have a point about not wanting to fight a woman in the big match? Does the romance get in the way of the story? What is the point of boxing, anyway? Does Michelle Rodriguez have the greatest frown in cinematic history?

All this, plus a long tangent about dangerous sports, and on the Lunchtime Poll, we reveal our surprise hobby obsessions.

Paid in Puke S4E6: Girls Trip

On this episode, we embark on a Girls Trip with Malcolm D. Lee’s 2017 smash, written by Kenya Barris and Tracy Oliver. Girls Trip stars Regina Hall, Queen Latifah, Jada Pinkett Smith, but for us, it’s the Tiffany Haddish show all the way. The woman positively owns the Meaningful Passages segment today. There are some Hot Probs (that’s not at all how absinthe works), but it’s mostly a riotous good time following the Flossy Posse on their New Orleans adventure. 

On the Lunchtime Poll, we talk about memorial girls trips from our pasts.

Paid in Puke S4E5: The Farewell

On this episode, we’re talking about Lulu Wang’s 2019 film, The Farewell, which is “based on a real lie” and stars Awkwafina. What are the ethics of lying to your family? Is there any such thing as a “good” lie? What if it’s a stranger you will never see again? 

On the Lunchtime Poll, we reveal lies we have told our family. 

Paid in Puke will take a brief, mid-season break and return on December 1st, 2020. 

Paid in Puke S4E4: Us

On today’s episode, we have a million theories about the allegorical nature of Jordan Peele’s 2019 horror film, Us, starring Lupita N’Yongo. 

Is it about classism? Capitalism? The failed American Dream? Performative activism? Yes. And so much more. Peele stuns with his super tight scripts and narrative mirroring. ALL of the performers absolutely destroy playing two parts EACH. This movie is so good, ya’ll. Watch it right now if you haven’t already. 

On the Lunchtime Poll, we reveal our “Tethered Tells”. What do we do a little differently that would expose us possible underworld doppelgängers? 

Paid in Puke S4E3: Sweetheart

On today’s episode, we’re taking a deep dive into J.D. Dillard’s Blumhouse Creature Feature, Sweetheart, starring Kiersey Clemons (Antebellum). Clemons destroys as a woman trapped on an island with a Shape of Water-adjacent monster who doesn’t seem to want to make out at all. 

In the spirit of the film, we recorded this episode in Cristina’s back yard with plenty of ambient sound to set the scene, and lots of cameos from Cristina’s dog, Lily, who DOES seem to want to make out with Amy. On the Lunchtime Poll, we reveal our island survival skills (or lacktherof). 

Paid in Puke S4E2: Antebellum

On this episode, we puzzle over the myriad negative critical response to this highly-anticipated social justice horror debut from writer/director team, Gerard Bush and Christopher Renz (Bush + Renz). 2020’s Antebellum stars the singular force of nature that is Janelle Monáe, as well as a killer comedic turn from Gabourey Sidibe. (Baxter apologizes for repeatedly mispronouncing Gabby’s surname, but we got the corrective drop in there and she’s got it now).

We take a break from the heavy convo about rampant racism for a fun Lunchtime Poll inspired by Gabby’s takedown of a would-be suitor. And Amy’s eldest child, Logan (they/them), returns in Keggers with Kids.