Paid in Puke S5E6: Hard Candy



The second half of Series 5 kicks off with Peter Jackson’s 1994 crime drama, Heavenly Creatures, which introduced two phenomenal actors at once: Kate Winslet and Melanie Lynskey. It’s based on the true story of two mid-century teenagers in New Zealand (Pauline Parker and Juliet Hulme) who, lost in their own an imaginary world, enact a murderous plot to stay together against their parents’ wishes.

It’s a very special episode-long Keggers with Kids segment, as we’re joined by 14-year-old Logan G, who shares their masterful powers of perception with us on the nature of the girls’ friendship and who is really “to blame” in this terrible case that rocked a nation.

On the Lunchtime Poll, we talk about Honora almost skipping dessert before she’s “moidered”, and we share what we hope we would have done if we had no tomorrow.

Listen here!

Paid in Puke S5E5: 9 to 5

On today’s episode, we’re working overtime for Colin Higgins’ 1980 comedy 9 to 5, starring Jane Fonda, Lily Tomlin, and Dolly Parton. To help us discuss this timeless feminist farce, we’re joined by the delightfully effervescent Laura Laurence, an honorary Paid in Puke-ette who frequently gets name dropped on the pod! 

We touch on how little has changed in terms of workplace gender dynamics, why everyone is so mean to Doralee, and whether or not all children love Dabney Coleman.

On the Lunchtime Poll, we unsurprisingly all have stories about sexism in the workplace!

PiP goes on mid-season hiatus for a couple of weeks. We’ll be back toward the end of March with the second half of Series 5. In the meantime, don’t work too hard!

Paid in Puke S5E4: Blue Valentine

On today’s belated Valentine’s Day episode, we’re getting dark with Derek Cianfrance’s 2010 anti-romantic drama, Blue Valentine, starring Michelle Williams. Cianfrance wrote this film as a way to process his parents’ divorce when he was twenty years old. As bleak as it is, this film promotes two healthy things that are rife with stigma: abortions and divorce. We also touch on the very real emotions Williams brought to the role, the difficulties of changing tax brackets for the better, and how Shel Silverstein’s “The Giving Tree” is actually a rose-colored abusive relationship. The tree was NOT happy.

PS: Get your “The tree was not happy” merch here!

Paid in Puke S5E3: Bridesmaids

On today’s episode, we’re bonding over Paul Feig’s 2011 comedy, Bridesmaids, starring Kristen Wiig, Maya Rudolph, Rose Byrne, Melissa McCarthy, Ellie Kemper, and Wendi McLendon-Covey. For a hard-R comedy, it sure has a lot of layers and nuance regarding the feminine experience. For us, it brings up everything from the pressure of wedding culture to pushy boyfriends with a stopover at body grooming stigma. We also pay tribute to our favorite Wiig SNL characters, and call bull on the notion of sacred orifices.

On the Lunchtime Poll, we talk about men we dated who wouldn’t be named in the credits of our lives.

Paid in Puke S5E2: Showgirls

On this episode, we’re keeping it sleazy with Paul Verhoeven’s 1995 accidental camp classic, Showgirls, starring Elizabeth Berkeley and Gina Gershon. This movie is quite figuratively one long Hot Prob with one or two Not Probs of note, contributed by the talented cast.

To get to the bottom of things, we’re joined by a very special guest: the oft-referenced Baxter BFF, Faye Hoerauf!

You’ll laugh! You’ll cry! You’ll flail! You’ll puke!

On the Lunchtime Poll, we discuss possible interpretations of the Doggy Chow scene and reveal weird things we ate as a kid.

Paid in Puke S5E1: Promising Young Woman

On our Series 5 premiere, we’re gaga for Emerald Fennell’s 2020 debut feature, Promising Young Woman, starring Carey Mulligan, Laverne Cox, Alison Brie, and Jennifer Coolidge.

This film blew us away with it’s stylized look, DEEP subtext, and pitch-perfect performance. So much so, that the episode is a little longer than usual, but we hope you’ll find it’s worth it. If you haven’t seen the film, please rectify that immediately and then come back and listen to this episode.

In Keggers with Kids, 13-year-old Logan joins us to give their youthful insight, and on the Lunchtime Poll, we reveal silly songs that are meaningful to us.

TRIGGER WARNING: This episode discussed sexual assault and rape culture at length.

Paid in Puke S4E10.1 HOLIDAY SPECIAL: Happiest Season

On our (slightly late) Holiday Special, we’re talking about the controversial 2020 film Happiest Season, directed by Clea Duvall and written by Duvall and Mary Holland. It marks our 3rd Mackenzie Davis film. It also stars Kristen Stewart, Holland, Alison Brie, Mary Steenburgen, and Aubrey Plaza. We talk about how Abby should have left Harper for Riley (2/3 of us are Team Riley, and Baxter is a Harper apologist), the very unnecessary and perplexing shoplifting plot, Dan Levy’s pitch-perfect performance, and our complex personal relationships to the holiday season.

Happy Holidays to our beloved Paid in Puke listeners. We will return in Feb-ish with Series 5!

Paid in Puke S4E10: Beatriz at Dinner

On today’s episode, we’re (mostly) delighting in Miguel Arteta’s 2017 dramedy, Beatriz at Dinner, starring Salma Hayek, Connie Britton, Chloë Sevigny, and Amy Landecker. Beatriz (Hayek) is a holistic massage therapist and Mexican immigrant circumstantially trapped in a palatial estate with her wealthy client and her husband’s business partners.

In Hot Probs, we discuss how normally, a Mike White script doesn’t mess around, but this one does a little bit. Still, White does a commendable job depicting racist/classist micro-aggressions through the natural conversational flow of a Boomer dinner party.

On the Lunchtime Poll, we reveal the bridge-too-far in dinner conversation that would prompt us to take a stand and ruin the night for everyone else.

This is the last episode of Series 4, but we’ll be back next week with a late holiday special!

Paid in Puke S4E9: Jackie Brown

On today’s episode, we’re talking about Quentin Tarantino’s first female-driven film, 1997’s Jackie Brown, starring Pam Grier and Bridget Fonda. Based on the novel, Rum Punch by Elmore Leonard, it’s not without the usual Tarantino trappings (feet, rampant use of the n-word, built-in misogyny), but there’s a lot to love in this most underrated of Quentin joints.

On the Lunchtime Poll, we reveal our hypothetical filmmaker signatures and discover something surprising about Mario Cantone.

Ex-Rated Podcast: In Bruges

I got to be a guest on one of my favorite podcasts, Ex-Rated! They were doing their Christmas in December series (gotta love that name) and asked me to pick a backdoor Christmas movie. I chose Martin McDonagh’s 2008 existential drama, “In Bruges”.

Happy Winter Solstice everybody! For those of us in the northern hemisphere, it’s the darkest day of the year, which makes this week’s Christmas flick all the more appropriate. Superstar friend of the pod Jessica Baxter joins us to discuss Martin McDonagh’s feature length debut, In Bruges (2008). Set against the backdrop of a freakin’ medieval fairy tale fantasy, this dark comedy smartly deals with classic religious themes such as guilt and purgatory, but looks at them through a very modern lens. The result, thanks to the brilliant script and impressive performances, is a rich, funny, and eminently watchable ride. Join us for an episode that includes our terrible attempts at Irish accents, a Gleeson family surprise, and a scale that goes all the way up to blobbychongas, this week on Ex Rated Movies!

Listen to the episode on all major podcast apps or click here!