15 Stars Who Had To Work For A-Listers Before They Made It Big

We’ve all had that fantasy about telling our bosses to stuff it and quitting our day jobs to follow our dreams. But in Hollywood, sometimes your boss just happens to be a big star and working for them is an important step on the road to success. Maybe one day, you can cash in on the fact that you babysat one of the Jolie-Pitts or picked up Bradley Cooper’s dry cleaning.

Before they hit it big the stars on this list were workaday stiffs just like the rest of us. Okay, so some of these stars had connections and opportunities that weren’t open to the average Joe or Josephine. Maybe some of them didn’t even really need the work for, say, monetary purposes. The important thing is that these celebrities spent time working under someone else before they found success and became their own bosses.

Plus, the struggle is relative. Kim Kardashian’s early employment probably seemed really hard to her. Maybe Allison Williams is extra nice to her personal assistant because she’s been on the other side of things. Aspiring young actors take note: babysitting child stars and famous offspring is a perfectly legitimate jumping off point for a career in the entertainment industry.

Here are 15 Stars Who Had To Work For Other Stars Before They Made It.

Read the list at Screenrant!


18 Actors You Didn’t Know Overcame Learning Disabilities

It often seems like the stars lead carefree lives, but they’re more susceptible to human foibles than you might think. Despite the associated shame, learning disabilities are an extremely common occurrence all over the world, and Hollywood is no exception. A reported 2.4 million students have been diagnosed with some form of learning disability.

This list of A-List actors is but a handful of the stars that refused to let a learning disability keep them from realizing their dreams. Among the conditions represented here are Dyslexia (affecting reading, writing, and information processing), Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (inhibiting focus and behavior control), and Dyspraxia (causing coordination and language problems).

Despite their prevalence, learning disabilities can feel insurmountable. The lack of support can cause feelings of inadequacy, and hopelessness. But it doesn’t have to be that way. With the help of organizations, tutors, and sometimes in-school resources, LD children can become thriving adults.

In fact, many of these actors credit their brain chemistry for their success. Some even refer to their diagnoses as “a gift”. Perhaps these so-called disabilities only seem that way because society, and particularly the education system, isn’t set up to deal with the brains of these special thinkers.

Read the list at Screenrant!